Kirk's Blog

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Kirk started writing articles for his blog around the time his first book was published (September 2011). Not having any other bright ideas at the time, he adopted the book title as his “brand” for the blog. Over time, Shaky Paws Grampa (SPG) has become his “identity” in the PD world. The good news is that he hasn’t had to fight anybody for it and there was no competition for the web address (understandably).

He didn’t have any clear goals in mind for the blog when he started other than to make his target audience the “PD world”, opting to write about what ever inspired him at the moment. Over time, various themes emerged:

Book or writing-related
PD-related information
Clinical research study advocacy/participation
Cognition issues
Living with PD-personal
PD meeting/conference announcements
SPG speaking engagements, media interviews, and webinars
Calls to action
Personal

Three years later, he has posted 120 articles that have been viewed by readers from over 60 countries around the world.
Kirk Hall

Reflections on Time

WPC blogger partner

I just finished reading a thought- provoking, inspirational book that I highly recommend on my Kindle Fire called The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom.  By the way, I got it for free as an ebook through my library on Overdrive.  All you need is a library card and some type of electronic reader to have access to thousands of books!  I enjoy reading even though it is a “draining” activity.  Probably good for my brain, which can use all the help it can get!

Time itself is a precious commodity.  Albom’s book looks at how the measurement of time, which we can’t imagine living without, has real potential downsides in the hands of humans.  The book is described in reviews as a “fable”.  It certainly is creative and a very interesting read.

Since reading the book, I have been thinking about how it might apply to me.  I noticed very early in my PD journey that I had begun to experience time in a different way that I described as “ethereal” (a fancy word that I don’t get to use a lot).  I was having trouble keeping track of time (like what day, month, or year it was) plus chunks of time seemed to go by very quickly when viewed in hindsight.  I am sure that my inability to remember much of what I had done the previous day, week, or month was a contributing factor.

Reading the definition reminded me of another favorite books, Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander, M.D.   One of the things I remember about Dr. Alexander’s near-death experience is that, when he “returned”, he described having been “gone” a very long time.  Comparing this to my sense of large amounts of time
“disappearing” led to an epiphany of sorts, at least in my mind.  Perhaps it is too much of a stretch to compare my ongoing personal time observation with that of Dr. Alexander’s.  Perhaps not.

None of us know how much time we will have on this earth, but we all have the opportunity to decide (as long as we are able to decide) how we want to spend that time.  As I have said before, Linda and I decided some years ago what we wanted our final years to “look like”.  We decided that our goal would be to “finish the race well”.  Mitch Albom has provided a useful framework for helping make that happen.

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Kirk Hall

Reflections on Time

I just finished reading a thought- provoking, inspirational book that I highly recommend on my Kindle Fire called The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom.  By the way, I got it for free as an ebook through my library on Overdrive.  All you need is a library card and some type of electronic reader to have access to thousands of books!  I enjoy reading even though it is a “draining” activity.  Probably good for my brain, which can use all the help it can get!

Time itself is a precious commodity.  Albom’s book looks at how the measurement of time, which we can’t imagine living without, has real potential downsides in the hands of humans.  The book is described in reviews as a “fable”.  It certainly is creative and a very interesting read.

Since reading the book, I have been thinking about how it might apply to me.  I noticed very early in my PD journey that I had begun to experience time in a different way that I described as “ethereal” (a fancy word that I don’t get to use a lot).  I was having trouble keeping track of time (like what day, month, or year it was) plus chunks of time seemed to go by very quickly when viewed in hindsight.  I am sure that my inability to remember much of what I had done the previous day, week, or month was a contributing factor.

Reading the definition reminded me of another favorite books, Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander, M.D.   One of the things I remember about Dr. Alexander’s near-death experience is that, when he “returned”, he described having been “gone” a very long time.  Comparing this to my sense of large amounts of time
“disappearing” led to an epiphany of sorts, at least in my mind.  Perhaps it is too much of a stretch to compare my ongoing personal time observation with that of Dr. Alexander’s.  Perhaps not.

None of us know how much time we will have on this earth, but we all have the opportunity to decide (as long as we are able to decide) how we want to spend that time.  As I have said before, Linda and I decided some years ago what we wanted our final years to “look like”.  We decided that our goal would be to “finish the race well”.  Mitch Albom has provided a useful framework for helping make that happen.

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